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Sweatshop Workers Visit Govt Officials, Students, and Unions

Already, our guests have spoken to hundreds of people--students, union
members, elected officials, the media, sharing their personal stories
and inviting people in the U.S. to support their struggles:

Savin Phal, from Cambodia, is a mother of five who was recently fired
from her job at the King's Land factory sewing Wal-Mart brand clothing
because she tried to organize a union. Now she is the vice president of
a local union with the Coalition of Cambodian Apparel Workers
Democratic Union (C.CAWDU).

Wal-Mart Sweatshop Workers Speaking Tour

Join SweatFree Communities and the International Labor Rights Forum for the 2008 Wal-Mart Sweatshop Workers Speaking Tour

From April 6-18, 2008, workers from Costa Rica and Cambodia
will visit ten cities in Michigan and Ohio, sharing their stories of
what it's like to work in the fields and factories that fill the
shelves of Wal-Mart. With your help we will educate our communities
about the high cost behind Wal-Mart's much publicized low prices, and
we will inspire action to improve working conditions at home and
abroad.

Cargill & ADM: Supporting Slavery?

Section 3105 of the Farm Bill, called Voluntary Certification of Child Labor Status of Agricultural Imports, would provide a method which producers of agricultural products could use to certify that their products are free of child labor and forced labor.  The Department of Labor, under the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005, is compiling a list of imported goods believed to be produced using forced labor or child labor in violation of international standards.

Is Free Trade Worth This?

It should be noted that most Colombian workers and their unions are against the proposed U.S.-Colombia trade agreement; unlike American investors, workers in Colombia have little to gain by further U.S. investment without real accountability for violence against unions and for other human rights abuses.

Fair Trade in the Classroom: Empowering Youth as Global Citizens

But how can students begin to relate to people half way
across the world, to have an inkling of what it is like to work on a cocoa
farm, at a t-shirt factory, a banana plantation?

ANNOUNCING TRANSFAIR’S K-12 CURRICULUM: FOCUS ON FAIR TRADE

The Focus
on Fair Trade Curriculum
offers an accessible way to introduce
students of all ages to the concept of global interdependence through an
exploration of familiar foods produced outside the USA: chocolate, bananas and
coffee; and an introduction to Fair Trade.

Sweatshop workers from the DR Speak at U of Maryland

However, USAS decided to arrange a speaking tour with Julio and Manuel
to bring their stories to the college students who buy the clothes they
make. Educating the students, who then put pressure on their
university, who put pressure on the apparel companies, is a way to
change the conditions at TOS Dominicana and sweatshops elsewhere. Once
Hanes heard about the speaking tour and started receiving responses
from students, the company decided to meet with the union organizers at
TOS.

What Should We Do About Wal-Mart?

Here is a snippet that was written yesterday by Reuters entitled Wal-Mart pushing Chinese suppliers to go green:

 

Wal-Mart Stores Inc will meet with its thousands of Chinese suppliers
this fall as part of a big push to reduce waste and emissions at
factories that make its products, Chief Executive Lee Scott said on
Thursday.

The company's top priorities in China will be to address the
appropriate disposal of waste as well as to make reductions in both
waste and greenhouse gas emissions. It will also work on reducing
packaging and boosting energy efficiency, much as it has in its U.S.
business, Scott said.

No Irish Need Apply

So, as you may head out to the bar this St. Patrick’s Day to raise a
Guinness to the old country, you may want to think more about your
ancestors’ journey and how that journey relates to the current
situation for Latino immigrants in the United States. Below are some
things to think over.

Read the below passage about Irish immigrants at the turn of the century:

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