In the News

Condemned

Inquirer (Philippines)
11/14/2006

WHO CAN forget the manner in which the American Chamber of Commerce of the Philippines (AmCham) lavished praise on Ferdinand Marcos for proclaiming martial law? Back then, it breathlessly sang the praises of dictatorship: "[AmCham] wishes you every success in your endeavors to restore peace and order, business confidence economic growth and the well-being of the Filipino people and nation. We assure you of

our confidence and cooperation in achieving these objectives. We are communicating these feelings to our associates and affiliates in the United States."

Denuncian activistas rapacidad y explotacion laboral de Wal-Mart

La Jornada (Mexico)
11/12/2006

By Emir Olivares Alonso

The cost the community has to pay for Wal-Mart’s low prices is very high, since the company represents the most predatory form of capitalism, because it exploits its workers, suppliers, communities and towns where it sets up shop, in addition to the fact that it devastates the environment, says Ruben Garcia of Global Exchange.

U.S., Mexico Activists Fight Wal-Mart

Associated Press
11/12/2006

By Mark Stevenson

MEXICO CITY -- U.S. and local activists formed a common front on Sunday to fight the expansion of Wal-Mart stores in Mexico, saying small stores and the national culture are under threat from what is already the world's biggest retailer.

Activists from several U.S. groups and 10 Mexican labor, community and commercial organizations wrapped up a two-day meeting dubbed the First Binational U.S.-Mexico Meeting Against Wal-Mart.

US retail giants urge Arroyo to protect human, labor rights

Inquirer (Philippines)
11/11/2006

By Nonoy Espina

IN THE latest broadside against the Philippine government’s rights record, seven major American retail outfits that source garments from the Philippines have written President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo calling for more “proactive measures” to protect human and labor rights and right advocates.

The November 7 letter, a copy of which was obtained by INQ7.net, was written in the wake of reports about “violent attacks on striking workers and the assaults and killings of labor rights promoters,” particularly in the Cavite Export Processing Zone.

US retail giants urge Arroyo to protect human, labor rights

INQ7.net
11/11/2006

By Nonoy Espina

IN THE latest broadside against the Philippine government’s rights record, seven major American retail outfits that source garments from the Philippines have written President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo calling for more “proactive measures” to protect human and labor rights and right advocates.

The November 7 letter, a copy of which was obtained by INQ7.net, was written in the wake of reports about “violent attacks on striking workers and the assaults and killings of labor rights promoters,” particularly in the Cavite Export Processing Zone.

US companies express alarm over priest’s slay

Manila Bulletin
11/08/2006

At least seven big foreign-owned companies, including Wal-Mart, have expressed alarm over cases of killings, violence and attacks against workers on strike in Cavite.

In their joint letter on Nov. 7 to President Arroyo, the companies — American Eagle Outfitters, Gap Inc., Jones Apparel Group, Liz Claiborne Inc., PVH, Polo Ralph Lauren and Wal-Mart, expressed alarm on behalf of their companies over the "violent attacks on striking workers and the assaults and killings of labor rights promoters."

Liberia’s Foreign Investment Challenge

BBC News
11/08/2006

By Bill Law

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO THE EXTENDED RADIO REPORT (This report begins 1:16 into recording; Firestone section begins at 13:42)

For years Liberia has traded its natural resources in return for services such as health and education from foreign corporations but have Liberians paid too high a price?

"These buildings were destroyed on the premise that they belonged to somebody else and that is the story all across Liberia," said Olu Menjay.

Murder in Colombia Prompts Group to Sue Nestle Units in Miami

Miami Herald
10/28/2006

The widow of a brutally murdered Nestlé worker joins others in a lawsuit against the firm over her

husband's death.

BY JANE BUSSEY

jbussey [at] MiamiHerald.com

Colombian trade unionist Luciano Enrique Romero died a slow death. The fired Nestlé factory worker, whose body was found in a paramilitary-controlled area of Colombia a year ago, was tied up, tortured and then stabbed 40 times.

Pages