In the News

Haiti Seeks US Tariff Relief for Garment Industry

LA Times
06/17/2006

The HOPE Act would create tens of thousands of jobs, proponents say.

By Carol J. Williams

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - Vladimir Fabre had what passes here for a

decent-paying job: work as a fabric roller at a factory making T-shirts

for U.S. discount stores.

But three years ago, Fabre, his mother and four of his siblings lost

their employment, thanks to rising political violence here and fierce

competition from Asia. The Fabres now eke out an existence by boiling a

Jeans Take the Global Production Path

Women's Wear Daily
06/16/2006

By Evan Clark

WASHINGTON -THE MANUFACTURING OF BLUE jeans, a quintessential partof the American clothing culture since the Fifties, has gone global along with the rest of apparel production.

Domestic producers in the last decade or so have focused on the high end, as production of basic, volume-oriented styles migrated primarily south of the border to Mexico and Latin America.

Black Residue Settles Over Santa Marta

Los Angeles Times
06/14/2006

By Chris Kraul



SANTA MARTA, Colombia: This historic port city was once touted by the Colombian government as the next Acapulco, with its scenic bay, white sand beaches, colonial history and the eco-tourism potential of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, home to one of the largest and oldest pre-Columbian settlements in the Americas.

Then came the coal dust.

Black Residue Settles Over Santa Marta

Los Angeles Times
06/14/2006

By Chris Kraul

SANTA MARTA, Colombia: This historic port city was once touted by the Colombian government as the next Acapulco, with its scenic bay, white sand beaches, colonial history and the eco-tourism potential of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, home to one of the largest and oldest pre-Columbian settlements in the Americas.

Then came the coal dust.

Pakistani children go from making to playing with soccer balls

Associated Press Worldstream
06/12/2006

By Paul Garwood

Twelve-year-old Adnan Nazir spent three years working, literally, until his fingers bled from hand-stitching footballs that the world's soccer elite prefer.

But on a recent sweltering day, he got to play with one of these balls for the first time in a team of other boys who, like Nazir, were taken from sweatshops where they had worked and enrolled in schools as part of a U.N.-led project against child labor.

Congo's child miner shame

BBC News
06/12/2006

By Orla Guerin

To commemorate World Day Against Child Labour, BBC News has spent a day with child miners in the Democratic Republic of Congo, who work for about one dollar per day. At Ruashi mine, in the Eastern province of Katanga, almost 800 children dig for copper and cobalt.

At eight years of age, Decu has never owned a football, or played a video game. He has no computer, and no TV. He's never been to school, though he passes young pupils in uniform every morning, as he sets off for work.

Next Chinese export: Inflation

International Herald Tribune (France)
06/12/2006

By Matthew Benjamin and Nerys Avery Bloomberg News

BEIJING Rising production costs in China might soon turn the smiley- faced Wal-Mart logo on that rack of $7 cardigan sweaters into a frown.

Higher wages and new environmental regulations, along with higher raw- materials prices, are pushing up the costs of manufacturing in China. That will lead to higher prices for the clothing, toys, electronics and other products the nation exports, said economists, manufacturers and others involved in the China trade.

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