In the News

Wal-Mart, Retailers Stumble Overseas as U.S. Formulas Falter

Bloomberg
08/01/2006

By Lauren Coleman-Lochner in New York

Aug. 1 (Bloomberg) -- When it comes to selling overseas, the strategies of American retailers don't always translate.

The failed attempt of Wal-Mart Stores Inc., the world's largest retailer, to conquer Germany illustrates the pitfalls of trying to stamp the U.S. model on another culture. Companies from Starbucks Corp. to Toys ``R'' Us Inc. have had to change the formulas that brought them domestic success when they have expanded abroad.

Students vs. Sweatshops, Round III; The Designated Supplier Program targets college clothing companies

ILRF
08/01/2006

By Mischa Gaus

CLAUDIA EBEL IS TRAVELING across Thailand this summer, but her itinerary is no vacation. The University of Colorado at Boulder sophomore is meeting with sweatshop workers, promoting a plan to change how college clothes are made -- and the lives of the people who make them.

Wal-Mart, Retailers Stumble Overseas as U.S. Formulas Falter

Bloomberg News
08/01/2006

By Lauren Coleman-Lochner in New York

Aug. 1 (Bloomberg) -- When it comes to selling overseas, the strategies of American retailers don't always translate.

The failed attempt of Wal-Mart Stores Inc., the world's largest retailer, to conquer Germany illustrates the pitfalls of trying to stamp the U.S. model on another culture. Companies from Starbucks Corp. to Toys ``R'' Us Inc. have had to change the formulas that brought them domestic success when they have expanded abroad.

An unhappy toy story: Unrest in China

International Herald Tribune
07/28/2006

By Donald Greenlees and David Lague

HONG KONG Four major American companies, including Walt Disney and McDonald's, ordered an investigation Friday into allegations that a riot at a big toy supplier in the Chinese city of Dongguan had been sparked by poor wages and living conditions for 11,000 factory workers, executives at the companies confirmed.

Organic for everyone, the Wal-Mart way: America's biggest company is also the world's biggest purchaser of organic cotton

Fortune Magazine
07/27/2006

By Marc Gunther, Fortune senior writer

NEW YORK (Fortune) -- The $300-billion global cotton industry uses more pesticides and synthetic fertilizers than any other crop. Cotton Inc., the industry trade group, says that's nothing to worry about, but you don't have to be a scientist to know that applying tons and tons of pesticides to the soil - more than 50 million pounds in the United States alone - probably isn't a good thing.

Organic for everyone, the Wal-Mart way

Fortune Magazine
07/27/2006

By Marc Gunther, Fortune senior writer

NEW YORK (Fortune) -- The $300-billion global cotton industry uses more pesticides and synthetic fertilizers than any other crop. Cotton Inc., the industry trade group, says that's nothing to worry about, but you don't have to be a scientist to know that applying tons and tons of pesticides to the soil - more than 50 million pounds in the United States alone - probably isn't a good thing.

Packaged Foods Exposed II (Nestle)

Kootenay Co-op Radio (Nelson, BC)
07/27/2006

Deconstructing Dinner - a syndicated weekly one-hour radio program that discusses the impacts our food choices have on ourselves, our communities and the planet.

On July 27 a feature spotlight on Nestle was done, and used the Polaris Institute's Corporate Profile of the company as a foundation for the broadcast. The ILRF was mentioned during the broadcast.

See broadcast and its accompanying web page. www.cjly.net/deconstructingdinner/072706.htm

Follow the thread

Financial Times
07/22/2006

By Alan Beattie

It was when Peter Mandelson, Europe's trade commissioner, produced a bar of Fairtrade chocolate during his parliamentary confirmation hearing that it became clear how far the movement had come. Mandelson, a skilled practitioner of political image and branding, knows a bandwagon when he sees one.

Ellen Justifies Canceling of Agreements

The Analyst (Monrovia)
07/16/2006

President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf has been meeting with officials and members of the Liberian National Bar Association, in ongoing consultations with National Stakeholders. She briefed members of the Bar on the current state of affairs. The President reiterated the government's current review of concession agreements, saying "It is in the national interest."

Madam Sirleaf told the lawyers that government had no choice but to cancel and or review all concession agreements. The

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